Womens Justice Center




















News Round-up ~ Resumen de noticias


 

People with disabilities are among the most discriminated against in Bolivia. Fed up of being ignored, a group of them marched across the Andes to the seat of the Government in La Paz, asking to speak with President Evo Morales. They are met with riot police, barricades, tear gas and water cannons.

Headed by a group of determined leaders such as; Rose Mery, Marcelo, Feliza and Miguel, the protestors set camp in the streets, a block from the main Plaza where the Government palace is located. For the first time in Bolivia’s history, the police erect 3m high barricades, station tanks and hundreds of riot police to stop the protestors in wheelchairs from entering the plaza.

Violent confrontations flare up between police and the people with disabilities, including the use of pepper spray and water cannon on the protestors. The government refuses to discuss their request for a pension of $70 a month and the protestors suspend themselves from the city's bridges in their wheelchairs.

As public pressure grows, can Rose Mery and her fellow wheelchair-bound protestors win their fight?

Read our article about the changes the protests have caused since this film was shot - https://www.theguardian.com/global-de...

Directors, producers and editors: Violeta Ayala and Dan Fallshaw
Co-producers: Fernando Barbosa and Andrea Monasterios
Executive producers for the Guardian: Charlie Phillips, Lindsay Poulton and Laurence Topham
This video is produced in collaboration with the Sundance Institute Short Documentary Fund supported by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
 

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Women of Color Network

 
We are so happy to release the Spring 2017 issue of Women of Color Voices Magazine: #SayHerName Jagged Justice Edition.  

We are grateful to the artists, activists, advocates and Aspiring Allies that lent their voices and talents to this special edition! We have two version for your viewing, please see:
1) Quick View FlipBook Magazine by clicking: http://online.fliphtml5.com/gfkr/tnmr/
2)  Or this format with clickable link here:  https://www.dropbox.com/s/yb0kr5i57jybpwt/2017%20Spring%20Voices.pdf?dl=0
 If you are interested in submitting articles for the Fall Edition, please email Zoe Flowers atzflowers@wocninc.org with your proposed article content, or look for the upcoming request for articles coming soon.

Thank you, WOCN, Inc.
We are so happy to release the Spring 2017 issue
Let us know how we are doing!  The contact information is located in the Update, feel free to reach out anytime. Thank you!

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Women’s Media Training Toolkit

Author: 

Date: April 28, 2017

If you need to know more about how to communicate your campaign to others, this Media Training Toolkit will help you. It introduces basic ‘need to know’ information about telling your stories to new audiences using photography and social media, and gives advice on engaging with mainstream media.

Direct Link to Full 44-Page 2017 Women’s Media Training Toolkit:

http://globalforestcoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/women2030-media-tooklit.pdf

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Hablar para no morir

Los testimonios que reúne Lula Gómez en el documental ‘Mujeres al frente. La ley de las más nobles’, reivindican la participación de las mujeres en el proceso de paz en Colombia

Madrid, 27 abril. 17. Amecopress. Las mujeres siempre han sufrido las consecuencias de la guerra, en mayor medida y de un modo diferente a los hombres. Aunque no hayan formado parte de las decisiones que las desencadenan. Aunque no se cuente con ellas cuando el conflicto acaba. Colombia es el primer país donde las mujeres están participando en los procesos de paz. Y, como la misma ONU reconoce, esa es la mejor garantía para que la paz perdure. Si este argumento no te convence, revisa el extraordinario trabajo de la periodista Lula Gómez, que en su documental ‘Mujeres al frente’ recoge el testimonio de siete mujeres colombianas que hartas de la guerra y el patriarcado, optaron por soluciones alternativas a la violencia. 
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EXCERPT: 

"Women are not being given the credit for having skills such as being strategic and good planners and being able to mediate rather than resort to physical force," said Sheriff Sadie Darnell of the Alachua County Sheriff's Office in Gainesville, Florida, and a member of the Generation W panel. "I think the numbers definitely show there's less brutality complaints when you have women more integrated with the public safety force."

There are certainly fewer women than men on the force -- with just 13% of women in the overall police force today, according to the National Center for Women and Policing -- but there still appear to be fewer complaints against female police on average versus male police, Jay Newton-Small reports in her book "Broad Influence: How Women are Changing the Way America Works."

An all-female law enforcement panel at a recent women's conference.

The average male officer is 8½ times more likely to have an excessive force complaint against him than a woman, according to an analysis by the National Center for Women and Policing. (PDF) When it comes to excessive force liability lawsuits, the average male officer costs between 2½ and 5½ times more than the average female police officer. The average male officer is two to three times more likely to have been named in a citizen's excessive force complaint.

Newton-Small, in a story for Time magazine, said that studies show women "tend to draw their weapons less, look for nonphysical solutions and are much better at community outreach."

This doesn't mean female officers never use excessive force. A case in Tulsa, Oklahoma, last year received national attention after a white female police officer was charged in the shooting death of an unarmed black motorist. But the overwhelming majority of police-involved shootings involve men.

SEE FULL ARTICLE

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http://www.inclusivepeace.org/content/making-women-count-not-just-counting-women-assessing-womens-inclusion-and-influence-peace

Direct Link to Full 64-Page 2016 Publicationhttp://www.inclusivepeace.org/sites/default/files/IPTI-UN-Women-Report-Making-Women-Count-60-Pages.pdf

cid:image003.png@01D2C1FA.87B55B40

Fifteen years after the adoption of the landmark UN Security Council Resolution 1325, women remain significantly underrepresented in peace and transitional processes. A central challenge is the lack of evidence-based knowledge on the precise role and impact of women’s inclusion on peace processes. When women have been included in the past, it was mainly due to normative pressure applied by women’s groups and their international supporters.

This report is based on results from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies’ multi-year research project entitled “Broadening Participation in Political Negotiations and Implementation” (2011-ongoing), and was originally prepared as an input to the Global Study in preparation for the High-level Review on the Implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325.

This publication is also available in SpanishRussianArabic and French

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Brain injury a 'significant' issue for women who survive violence, but most research focuses on men

About 500,000 Canadians have dementia, according to the Alzheimer's Society of Toronto, and researchers would like to know if traumatic brain injury causes it to progress more quickly.

About 500,000 Canadians have dementia, according to the Alzheimer's Society of Toronto, and researchers would like to know if traumatic brain injury causes it to progress more quickly. (Hayden Bird/iStock )Between 30 and 80 percent of women who survive intimate partner violence may have a traumatic brain injury — but there's almost no research into how such an injury specifically affects women, according to Angela Colantonio, who helps lead an international task force on girls and women with acquired brain injury.

"It's been a very neglected field," said Colantonio, who is also director of the Rehabilitation Sciences Institute at the University of Toronto.

si-Angela-Colantonio

Angela Colantonio, a scientist at the University of Toronto, studies the effects of acquired brain injuries on girls and women. (Submitted by Angela Colantonio)

"We are just starting to research how women's bodies are different in terms of brain injury, and what the implications are for care," she said.  

"One injury that is specifically neglected is the injury of women in an intimate-partner violence context."

Repeated blows

When women are abused, Colantonio said, "up to 92 percent of the hits are to the head," meaning women suffer repeated injuries that are associated with a wide constellation of long-term effects.

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from intlawgrrls, With this post I would like to discusses some of the arguments developed in my newly published book with Cambridge University Press ‘Human Trafficking and Slavery Reconsidered: Conceptual Limits and States’ Positive Obligations in European Law’ (2017) and the more recent developments in the case law of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) under Article 4 of the (ECHR): the right not to be held in slavery, servitude and forced labour and not to be subjected to human trafficking.

Against the backdrop of the rich judicial output of the ECtHR, the case law under Article 4 ECHR is scarce. To be more precise, the existing judgments in which the Court has dealt with abuses inflicted by non-state actors (i.e. employers) reaching the level of severity of Article 4 are eight:[1] Siliadin v. FranceRantsev v. Cyprus and RussiaC.N. and V. v. FranceC.N. v. The United KingdomM. and Others v. Italy and Bulgaria (the complaint under Article 4 was found inadmissible in this case), L.E. v. Greece[2]J. and Others v. Austria[3]and Chowdury and Others v. Greece. By way of comparison, the judicial output of other human rights bodies regarding the right not to be held in slavery, servitude and forced labour, has not been much richer. The Human Rights Committee has not issued so far a single communication under Article 8 of the ICCPR concerning circumstances that can be generally described as contemporary forms of slavery and human trafficking.[4] The ECOWAS Community Court of Justice has delivered one judgment Hadijatou Mani KoraouNo. ECW/CCJ/JUD/06/08, 27 October 2008, where it found Niger in violation of the prohibition of slavery as set out in the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights; however the factual circumstances can be rather described as de jure rather than de facto slavery. Finally, it was only on 20 October 2016, when the Inter-American Court of Human Rights issued its first judgment under Article 6 (freedom from slavery) of the American Convention on Human RightsCase of the Hacienda Brasil Verde Workers v. Brasil.

 

With this post I would like to discusses some of the arguments developed in my newly published book with Cambridge University Press ‘Human Trafficking and Slavery Reconsidered: Conceptual Limits and States’ Positive Obligations in European Law’ (2017) and the more recent developments in the case law of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) under Article 4 of the (ECHR): the right not to be held in slavery, servitude and forced labour and not to be subjected to human trafficking.

Against the backdrop of the rich judicial output of the ECtHR, the case law under Article 4 ECHR is scarce. To be more precise, the existing judgments in which the Court has dealt with abuses inflicted by non-state actors (i.e. employers) reaching the level of severity of Article 4 are eight:[1] Siliadin v. FranceRantsev v. Cyprus and RussiaC.N. and V. v. FranceC.N. v. The United KingdomM. and Others v. Italy and Bulgaria (the complaint under Article 4 was found inadmissible in this case), L.E. v. Greece[2]J. and Others v. Austria[3]and Chowdury and Others v. Greece. By way of comparison, the judicial output of other human rights bodies regarding the right not to be held in slavery, servitude and forced labour, has not been much richer. The Human Rights Committee has not issued so far a single communication under Article 8 of the ICCPR concerning circumstances that can be generally described as contemporary forms of slavery and human trafficking.[4] The ECOWAS Community Court of Justice has delivered one judgment Hadijatou Mani KoraouNo. ECW/CCJ/JUD/06/08, 27 October 2008, where it found Niger in violation of the prohibition of slavery as set out in the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights; however the factual circumstances can be rather described as de jure rather than de facto slavery. Finally, it was only on 20 October 2016, when the Inter-American Court of Human Rights issued its first judgment under Article 6 (freedom from slavery) of the American Convention on Human RightsCase of the Hacienda Brasil Verde Workers v. Brasil.

 Overall, the scarcity of judicial engagement at international law level with slavery, servitude and forced labour can be described as striking. Since the ECtHR has recently started to engage more often with Article 4 of the ECHR due to new individual applications that have been filed, the Strasbourg Court’s case law might be a valuable source to draw from. In my book ‘Human Trafficking and Slavery Reconsidered: Conceptual Limits and States’ Positive Obligations in European Law’ (CUP, 2017), I review these recent developments under the ECHR and offer a comprehensive analysis of the challenges that needs to be addressed in terms of definitional limits and states’ positive obligations so that human rights law can more effectively respond to the factual reality that reveals that many individuals are subjected to severe forms of exploitation.

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You can’t fight for economic justice without also fighting for reproductive rights.

Bernie Sanders traveled to Nebraska this week to throw his support behind Omaha Democratic mayoral candidate, Heath Mello, who is running against the incumbent Republican mayor, Jean Stothert. A Mello win, Sanders has said, would give hope to other “progressive Democrats” in conservative states.

But Mello’s “progressive” credentials are questionable at best. As a state senator, he co-sponsored a bill mandating that women have an ultrasound before they can have an abortion, saying it represented a “positive first step to reducing the number of abortions in Nebraska.”

As a populist, Sanders has built a political career protesting economic inequality— and yet by campaigning for Mello, he has demonstrated a willingness to separate economic justice from reproductive justice. (So has Democratic National Committee Chair, Tom Perez, who is also helping to campaign for Mello and who has defended that decision, saying the job of the DNC is to help Democratic candidates win.) But abortion access is not just a medical issue, or even a social one; it is, at its core, also an economic concern. Here’s why.

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SEE ALSO:

NO BERNIE, THERE’S NO ECONOMIC JUSTICE WITHOUT ABORTION ACCESS

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Beliefs and Recommendations Regarding Child Custody and Visitation in Cases Involving Domestic Violence: A Comparison of Professionals in Different RolAuthor:  D. G. Saunders ; K. C. Fuller ; R. M. Tolman, Journal: Violence Against Women  Volume:22  Issue:6  Dated:May 2016  Pages:722 to 744

  Publication Date:  05/2016
 

Abstract   PDF

Evaluating the Long-Term Effects of Prisoner Reentry Services on Recidivism: What Types of Services Matter?

  Author:  C. A. Visher ; P. K. Lattimore ; K. Barrick ; S. Tueller
  Journal: Justice Quarterly  Volume:Online First  Dated:February 2016
  Publication Date:  02/2016
  Abstract   PDF

Hidden Consequences: The Impact of Incarceration on Dependent Children

Author:  Eric Martin Journal: NIJ Journal  Issue:278  Dated:March 2017, Abstract   HTML  

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La responsabilidad recae en la sociedad y en el ‘pimponeo’ que les dan las entidades

“Nos están matando” y ya nos estamos acostumbrando a esa frase. Lo comprobamos una vez más con el asesinato de Claudia Giovanna Rodríguez, cuatro meses después de la violación y muerte de Yuliana Samboní y una semana después del intento de feminicidio de Paola Noreña en Bogotá.

Eso sin contar los miles de casos en otras ciudades que, lamentablemente, pueden terminar como el del lunes pasado en el centro comercial Santa Fe. Los feminicidios en Colombia se dan la mano y en parte porque las mujeres no encuentran la protección cuando la necesitan: la tramitología las está ‘matando’.

El mismo Gobierno lo sabe. De hecho, la consejera Presidencial para la Equidad de la Mujer, Martha Ordóñez, quien se pronunció por los casos que se han presentado en los últimos meses, reiteró que es necesario fortalecer todas las acciones de articulación institucional frente a la activación de las rutas de protección, atención y denuncia en los casos de violencias contras las mujeres.

Señaló que es muy importante el trabajo conjunto y coordinado por las diferentes autoridades con responsabilidad en ese proceso, incluyendo el sector salud, Policía, Fiscalía, justicia, Ministerio Público, entre otras, para que la ruta se active aplicando el principio de debida diligencia y se brinden las condiciones de seguridad necesarias para proteger a las mujeres víctimas.

En el papel todo se lee bien

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She had been involved in “Not one less” (“Ni una menos” in Spanish) protest movement that began in Argentina in 2015 and spread across Latin America and the world. The protests were resurrected in June 2016 to commemorate the anniversary of the movement and in October 2016, after three men were accused of the rape and murder of 16-year-old Lucia Perez in Mar del Plata.

A police dog located Garcia’s body on Saturday next to a tree in the outskirts of Gualeguay, naked and in an advanced state of decomposition, according to local police. Her family is now awaiting the result of the autopsy, which is to provide more information about the circumstances of her death.

Sebastian Jose Luis Wagner, 30, was arrested a day before the body was found. He had been jailed for nine years in 2012 for raping two women in 2010, but it emerged this weekend that a judge ordered his early release in July 2016 after he had completed only half his sentence.

In a statement, Fabiana Tunes, president of the government-linked National Council of Women, said: "We have two people responsible, both of whom are a product of a socio-cultural system that is sexist and patriarchal. On the one hand, the killer and on the other the judge, Carlos Alfredo Rossi, who decided to turn a deaf ear to the report of the provincial prison service and to the opinion of the prosecutor's office that advised against [Wagner’s] release.”

According to Tunes, failure of the the justice system highlighted the need for gender awareness. “This is something on which we are working hard,” she added.

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The shooting death of a teacher in San Bernardino, California, by her estranged husband was hardly an outlier – an estimated 50 women a month are shot to death in the US by former or current partners

In one mass shooting after another, some gun control advocates and journalists see a common thread: when domestic violence is not the immediate cause of a mass shooting, it was there as a warning sign in the history of the perpetrator.

On Monday, a husband murdered his wife, an elementary school teacher, and an eight-year-old child, opening fire on them in a classroom in San Bernardino, California, before turning the gun on himself, officials said. A nine-year-old student was also injured in the attack.

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SEE ALSO:

*  How to Investigate Domestic Violence Homicide

* Trump's rigorous asylum proposals endanger domestic abuse survivors

 

 

 

 

 

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Los colectivos feministas piden unanimidad en las políticas de igualdad entre todos los países europeos

  

Madrid, 06 abr 17. AmecoPress. El Colectivo unitario de París Île de France ha exigido que los derechos de las mujeres, la libre disposición de su cuerpo, el derecho al aborto y a la salud sean respetados y considerados derechos fundamentales por la igualdad en todos los países europeos. “El derecho al aborto en Europa es competencia de cada Estado. Prohibido en Irlanda y en Malta, sujeto a estrictos condicionamientos en Hungría y en Polonia, el derecho al aborto, incluso allí donde es legalmente reconocido, está de hecho en peligro o podría volver a estarlo por la cláusula de objeción de conciencia del personal sanitario (Italia), la carencia de estructuras hospitalarias adecuadas (Grecia, Baviera), la escasez de personal y la eliminación de centros donde llevar a cabo el aborto debido a reestructuraciones hospitalarias (Francia)”, reza el comunicado del colectivo. Las feministas también avisan de la elección de gobiernos reaccionarios, conservadores y retrógados en próximas citas electorales.

Asimismo, el comunicado insiste en unas pautas para que al aborto y la igualdad se convierta en una realidad:

  1. El acceso al aborto es un derecho
  2. El aborto es una elección personal.
  3. Mi cuerpo me pertenece y yo decido sobre mi vida.
  4. Hay que dotar de medios económicos los centros de planificación y los centros donde se practica el aborto para que éstos sean accesibles a todas las mujeres en todos los territorios.
  5. Es necesario poner en marcha campañas dirigidas a toda la población.
  6. La educación sexual debe ser accesible a todas y a todos para que nuestras decisiones sean libres e informadas.
  7. Las técnicas y los procedimientos abortivos deben estar incluidos en la formación inicial del personal sanitario.
  8. La cláusula de conciencia del personal sanitario debe ser suprimida.
  9. Los plazos legales para abortar tienen que ser armonizados siguiendo el modelo legislativo más progresista y tender a la despenalización total del aborto en todos los países europeos

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Part in English, Part in Italian

The panel addresses the challenges presented to the media covering male violence against women, and especially femicide (the killing of a woman because she is a woman). Looking at data and examples from both the UK and Italy, journalists and women’s rights experts will discuss the sexist bias often hidden within mainstream news narratives and debate the potential role of the media in reshaping traditional perceptions of gender-based violence and catalyze a cultural shift in society.
Con: Cristiana Bedei (freelance journalist), Salma Haidrani (freelance journalist), Sofia Lotto Persio (International Business Times UK), Stefania Prandi (photojournalist), Claudia Torrisi (Chayn Italy), Claudia Torrisi

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In light of the Sustainable Millennium Development Goals, economic empowerment, with its aims of both education and employment, is crucial for realizing women’s rights. Changing social contexts, displacement, migration and social exclusion require new innovative approaches to increase access to education and employment for women.

This symposium, sponsored by Fordham University's Institute for Women & Girls on 3/18/17, addressed comparative challenges and innovations that address access to employment for women migrants; entrepreneurship among women refugees; the use of microfinance and alternative economic development tools; as well as challenges and innovations aimed at combatting women’s trafficking.

 

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Neil Gorsuch may be a soft-spoken and gentlemanly Harvard-educated lawyer’s lawyer.  But his decision in the Hobby Lobby case, 723 F.3d 1114 (10th Cir. 2013), apparently overlooked by most commentators, demonstrates just how much American women have to fear if he is confirmed as a justice on the Supreme Court.

As we know, in Hobby Lobby v. Burwell, 134 S. Ct. 2751 (2014), the Supreme Court determined by a 5-4 majority that for-profit family owned corporations were “persons” who could assert the religious beliefs of their human shareholders to thwart the mandate of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that all employer-based and individual insurance plans covered under the ACA offer essential preventative services.

Hobby Lobby began when two family-owned for-profit corporations, Hobby Lobby and Mardel, sought a preliminary injunction in an Oklahoma federal district court, contending that they should not be compelled to comply with the ACA’s contraceptive services mandate because the Green family, the owners of these corporations, personally believed that certain of these FDA-approved forms of contraception constituted abortion, in violation of their religious belief that life begins at conception. The district court denied the injunction, and the case was appealed to the United States Court of Appeal for the Tenth Circuit. A plurality of the court held that Hobby Lobby and Mardel, as corporations, were entitled to a preliminary injunction precluding the enforcement of the ACA, ruling that these corporations’ “religious beliefs” trumped the government’s interest in providing preventative health care to millions of Americans under the ACA.

Judge Gorsuch concurred.  After expressing his agreement with the plurality opinion, he then framed the issue of the obligation to comply with the ACA mandate in moral and religious terms: “All of us face the problem of complicity. All of us must answer for ourselves whether and to what degree we are willing to be involved in the wrongdoing of others.” 723 F.3d at 1152 (Gorsuch, J., concurring). Here, the “wrongdoing” Judge Gorsuch was referring to was women’s use of certain forms of contraception that the Greens found to be the equivalent of an abortion.

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Over the past century, women have made significant gains in improving their lives. These improvements – including the rights to vote, property, and education – have been facilitated by social activism. In January 2017, people across the globe joined together in the largest global protest in history to demand equality for women. In this webinar, Dr. Dabney P. Evans 98PH will discuss the future of women’s rights in the US and abroad based on her academic research, highlighting the recent Women’s Marches and their role in signaling a new era of civil activism defending and promoting human rights.

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A la Fuerza Especial de Lucha Contra la Violencia (FELCV) llegaron el año pasado 492 denuncias contra policías y militares, quienes fueron acusados por agresiones físicas, acoso, abuso sexual y hasta feminicidio.

A la Fuerza Especial de Lucha Contra la Violencia (FELCV) llegaron el año pasado 492 denuncias contra policías y militares, quienes fueron acusados por agresiones físicas, acoso, abuso sexual y hasta feminicidio.

Las víctimas por lo general son sus parejas, sus exparejas o personas que dependen de ellos en sus fuentes de trabajo, según la dirección nacional de la FELCV.

De acuerdo con los datos oficiales, del total de denuncias que llegaron en 2016 en todo el territorio nacional,  390 fueron contra policías y 102 contra militares.

Sin embargo, en lo que va de este año la situación no cambia. Si bien no se conoce un informe oficial de enero a marzo, las denuncias fueron de dominio público.

Uno de los casos que sorprendió a la población fue el del director de la FELCV de La Paz, Bernardino Baldiviezo, quien fue enviado el fin de semana a la cárcel de Patacamaya por acoso sexual contra una de las policías que trabajan en la misma unidad policial.

Otro policía que también trabajaba en la FELCV de la población cruceña de Yapacaní, Armando Mamani Quispe,  fue detenido preventivamente hace una semana en el penal de San Pedro. Su expareja lo denunció por agresiones físicas.

Asimismo, por el lado de las Fuerzas Armadas también llegaron casos. Hace un mes el teniente de la Fuerza Aérea Boliviana (FAB) Ciro Sergio Sánchez Ríos ingresó a una unidad en la ciudad de Cochabamba, le disparó a su pareja en la cabeza y luego se quitó la vida.

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On International Women’s Day, March 8, a fire was set at a state home for children and youth in Guatemala, immediately killing 19 girls. Since then, at least another 21 have died as a result of their injuries and many more continue to be hospitalized.

Survivors have recounted that on March 7, several youth broke out of the Hogar Seguro Virgen de la Assunsión (Safe Home) in an attempt to escape the abusive conditions inside. Reports of extreme sexual violence, physical abuse, neglect, torture, and human trafficking have been documented for several years by children’s rights organizations and denounced with the Guatemala’s Human Rights Ombudsman’s office and at the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

After the breakout, police were immediately called to round up the youth who escaped. Fifty-two girls were then locked inside a room; according to one of the survivors, the group of teenage girls started rioting the morning of March 8 after having been locked in the room all night, subject to continued verbal assaults by police outside the door, and prevented from leaving to use the bathroom. Protesting the sexual violence that they face on a daily basis, a mattress was set on fire in the room, setting the room ablaze with the girls inside. Despite pleas as the fire spread, riot police did not open the locked door nor move to allow the girls out. The death toll has now risen to at least 40 teenage girls, between the ages of 12 and 17.

Several state officials have been arrested on charges of culpable homicide, negligence, and child abuse; however, many Guatemalan organizations are pointing to crimes so severe to warrant investigations for crimes against humanity.

Anything but a safe home

The system for child welfare in Guatemala is chronically under-resourced and reports of systemic abuse are rampant. The Hogar Seguro is no exception. Under its roof are children from the ages of 12-17 who have been removed from their homes due to violence and abuse. Several are children with disabilities. Some are youth who had nowhere else to go. Opened in 2010, the center was built for a capacity of 500 children. At the time of the fire, there were over 800 children being housed there.

For more background to the fire, read Francisco Goldman’s account for the New Yorker. 

An outcry from civil society

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With a different focus each month, people gather to write letters to officials, make phone calls, and learn about existing activist groups they can work with

Every second Sunday since Donald Trump was elected, groups of women across the country have been holding Solidarity Sundays – activist meet-ups that aim to resist the president. And the number of different meet-ups has been growing.

There are now more than 100 different Solidarity Sundays groups in the US, including in traditionally conservative states such as Missouri, Texas and Louisiana.

With a different focus each month, the organizers attempt to tackle national issues at a local level. People gather in apartments and houses to write letters to elected officials, make phone calls, and learn about existing activist groups they can work with.

“We try to build communities and encourage people to get in touch with local groups and let people know they are not alone in the feelings they are having,” said Emily Gallagher – the co-organizer, along with Ryan Kuonen, of the Williamsburg chapter of Solidarity Sundays, in Brooklyn, New York.

At their first meeting, in January, about 25 people gathered at Kuonen’s apartment. The February meeting, held in a loft apartment in Williamsburg, focused on the Black Lives Matter movement and attracted 60 people.

In March, the group focused on how women can run for office. The US congresswoman Carolyn Maloney gave a speech, and activists talked about running for local office.

“We try to have a guest speaker every time,” Gallagher said.

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SOLIDARITY SUNDAYS WEB PAGE

SOLIDARITY SUNDAYS MAP OF GROUPS AND CONTACT INFO

WANT TO HOST?

 

 

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