Womens Justice Center



















The Liberation of Women's Energy
Will Change the World. *


La liberación de la energía de la mujer cambiará el mundo


o provide advocacy, free of charge, for victims of rape, domestic violence, and child abuse, particularly in the Latina and other under served communities of Sonoma County. To provide advocacy training and community education. To promote more women and minorities in our law enforcement agencies. To commit to equal justice for all women and girls.


rindar una defensa gratuita a víctimas de violación, violencia doméstica y abuso infantil, particularmente en las comunidades hispanas y otras que no son atendidas adecuadamente en el condado de Sonoma. Proveer capacitación en defensa pública y educación comunitaria. Incrementar el número de mujeres y personas pertenecientes a minorías en nuestras agencias de aplicación de justicia. Comprometernos con la justicia igualitaria para todas las mujeres y las niñas.



News Round-up ~ Resumen de noticias


 

*Table of Contents*
*
*
*FEATURES*
· When Men Do Nothing (by Stephen McArthur)
· “Women’s Rights: Yeah, Yeah. Whatever.” (by Yashar Ali)
· From Beastly Boy to Profeminist (by Jessica Valenti)
· When a Beloved Teacher Is Also a Rapist (by Sarah Werthan
Buttenwieser)
· Dancing to Uncover a “New Maskulinity” (by Lacey Byrne)
· What Do Women Have to Do with Men’s Healing?

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“32 varones han muerto a manos de su pareja, femenina o masculina, en los últimos cinco años. 402 mujeres han muerto a manos de sus parejas o exparejas, en los últimos cinco años. No estamos hablando de lo mismo.”

Madrid, 15 jun. 12.Colectivo Novecento.- El domingo 10 de junio podíamos leer en el periódico El País el artículo, “Pocos, pero también víctimas“. Este abordaba la violencia que sufren los hombres por sus parejas, equiparándolo con la violencia de género, y añadiendo que estamos ante una minoría no reconocida. Joaquina Prades, autora de la noticia, alude a la discriminación en el código penal que sufren estas víctimas. Asimismo, incorpora al final de su artículo un texto titulado Lo siento, sólo atendemos mujeres, incidiendo así en la supuesta discriminación existente.

 

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About

Survivors Connect international online trafficking prostitution survivor network

This blog is a composite of writings and referrals to blog posts written by survivors of prostitution/trafficking.  It’s a place to find the writings of members of Survivors Connect, the International Online Leaderless Network of Trafficking/Prostitution Survivors.  When we act together it is much easier for us to speak the truth about the sex industry.    We no longer have to do it alone.  If we join voices, we’re stronger and harder to ignore.  It’s time for us to lead the anti-CSE movement and speak for ourselves.

SEE BLOG HERE

 

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Ex-Cop’s Sexual Crimes Threaten City’s Treasury

The City Council is just about to get a size-up from its legal team


How much could civil lawsuits stemming from a former police officer's sexual misconduct on the streets cost the city of San Diego?
                
The City Council is just about to get a size-up from its legal team.

Early next week, behind closed doors, the city attorney will brief Council members on 12 cases involving former officer Anthony Arevalos, who was sentenced to nearly nine years in prison and a $10,000 fine.
               

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Oakland

Oakland, California

Walk The Track

Saturday, August 4, 2012
8:00pm-9:00am: Registration
9:00am-1:00pm: Event
Carter-Gilmore Field
1390 66th Avenue, Oakland, CA

Join co-hosts Love Never Fails and the CASE Act in a 5K rally and march along "the track" in Oakland to raise awareness of the commercial exploitation of minors in our community, and to demonstrate our community's solidarity in support of our youth at-risk. After the walk, enjoy live music and entertainment, speakers, food, exhibits, and local anti-trafficking informational booths! Parental discretion is advised for those with young children.

* Additional speakers, entertainment, and organizations to come!

REGISTER HERE

FEATURED SPEAKERS

Daphne Phung
Chris Kelly
Mark Klass
Rev. Harry Willams

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By Becky Owens Bullard                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             The power of an image is immeasurable, especially when it comes to promoting awareness of an issue that people don’t exactly understand.  When we want every day citizens to engage in an issue they’d rather pretend doesn’t exist, we try to pique their interest by providing a photograph or video that they can associate with the issue – an image that will be burnt in their memory and make the issue real for them. Often times, these images that we use in awareness campaigns and community education on issues of abuse are our best chance of catching someone’s attention long enough to raise awareness and promote positive social change. Unfortunately, to inform our already media-saturated public we often resort to flashy visuals that do very little to accurately portray the crimes we hope to  accurately portray the crimes we hope to stop.

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crisis-hucha rota
La nueva norma amplía el concepto de víctimas a los hijos y familiares a cargo de las maltratadas.
La ley integral contra la violencia sobre la mujer, cuyo anteproyecto aprobará hoy el pleno del Consell, amplía la consideración de víctimas a los casos en los que los agresores ejerzan un «aislamiento económico» sobre sus parejas. Esta es una de las principales novedades que contempla la nueva normativa, toda vez que hasta ahora tenían condición de víctima las mujeres que habían sufrido agresiones físicas, psciológicas y sexuales.

Al incorporar el ámbito económico a la legislación autonómica, la Conselleria de Justicia y Bienestar Social pretende extender la protección que otorga la Generalitat a las mujeres que por problemas derivados de la crisis no puedan «llevar una vida digna» y soporten los malos tratos por una cuestión de supervivencia.

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Abstract: The study found that victim-focused outreach decreased women’s reluctance to work with prosecutors and increased their likelihood of participating in the prosecution of their abusers. In addition, findings indicated that outreach was particularly important for IPV survivors marginalized by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and those survivors still living with their abusers. Further, compared to IPV survivors who did not receive outreach services, women who received outreach reported decreased severity of the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and fear 1 year after the abuse. Although there were no effects of outreach on revictimization or social support levels, women randomly assigned to outreach services reported greater readiness to leave the abuser compared to women who did not receive outreach services. The outreach program was coordinated by an interdisciplinary victim service team, which identified a specific community-based agency to initiate phone outreach to each victim based on the victim’s unique needs. This offered the women a confidential means of learning about and accessing support and service from an agency that could provide relevant services without requiring the women to initiate a search for appropriate agencies. For the referral condition, a criminal justice system-based advocate from the prosecuting attorney’s office or police department contacted women IPV survivors to make referrals to community-based agency with which women could make contact if they chose to do so. The evaluation used an independent research team to assess multiple outcome measures as soon as possible after the abuse and then 6 and 12 months later. Participants were a diverse group of 236 women with a police-reported IPV call. 28 figures, 46 tables, and 83 references

Full Study PDF

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Abstract: This policy development guide is for use by administrators of tribal detention facilities in addressing policy issues related to the prevention, reduction, detection, and punishment of sexual abuse of prisoners under correctional supervision in tribal detention facilities. The guide was developed by the Bureau of Justice Assistance in response to the 2003 passage of the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), the first Federal legislation that addresses the issue of all forms of sexual abuse in custodial corrections settings. The guide is intended to assist administrators as review policies and procedures that safeguard detainees and inmates from sexual abuse. The guide is divided into four sections that provide information on the problem of corrections-based sexual assault, the impact of sexual abuse victimization on inmate behavior, and the ways in which existing agency policies can be revised and enhanced to more effectively protect the safety and security of inmates, facilities, and staff. The full text of the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 is also included in the guide, along with a list of suggested readings. Figures, list of resources, and references

Full Guide PDF

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Imparable violencia en Jalisco, Edomex, NL y Chihuahua

Entre 2009 y 2010, más de mil desaparecidas en sólo 4 estados

Por Gladis Torres Ruiz   
México, DF, 7 junio 12 (CIMAC).- En el ambiente de violencia que impera en el país por la guerra contra el narco iniciada por Felipe Calderón en 2006, son más mujeres que hombres las desaparecidas, asesinadas, violadas y sujetas a la trata de personas, según el reporte “El gobierno de México miente”, que organizaciones civiles presentarán ante Naciones Unidas.

 

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  • A Hingham, Massachusetts officer was arrested for allegedly assaulting his girlfriend.  The officer has been put on paid leave after he was arrested on four counts of domestic assault and battery http://bit.ly/NhYV1N
  • An Edmonds, Washington police officer was arrested on allegations of sexual misconduct involving a woman he detained after she jaywalked http://bit.ly/LoQAJ3
  • Chicago, Illinois police officers are being accused of excessive force after using a stun gun on a pregnant woman.  Police arrested the woman and her boyfriend after an argument over a parking ticket.  http://bit.ly/L3ogt2  
  • Old Forge, Pennsylvania Police Chief Larry Semenza is being investigated by the FBI.  The probe was sparked after an alleged victim reported a sexual relationship with Chief Semenza from 2004-2007 http://bit.ly/LhkA4J
  • Fullerton, California cop charged with the Kelly Thomas murder has been accused in another case of assault.  A disabled man claims he was thrown to the ground and stomped during his arrest last year by the officerhttp://bit.ly/KNt4UF

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By Arturo Wallace
BBC Mundo, Bogota

The 28-year-old Colombian recalls vividly the acid attack five years ago that left her with burns to her face, chest and hands, and cost her the use of her left eye.

"You never imagine that it can happen to you."

Acid-throwing is more usually associated with violence against women in countries such as Bangladesh or Pakistan, but current trends suggest the risk of women being disfigured and blighted by acid might actually be higher in Colombia.

The Colombian Institute of Legal Medicine registered 55 such attacks in 2010 and 42 in 2011.

A further 22 acid attacks have been reported so far this year.

According to Ms Hernandez, who belongs to a local acid-survivors group, the real number is much higher.

 

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 POR PRIMERA VEZ SE DEBATIERON EN UN CONGRESO LOS ALCANCES DEL FALLO DE LA CORTE

Los obstetra hablan de aborto

El titular de la Sociedad de Ginecología y Obstetricia reclamó a las autoridades sanitarias la implementación de protocolos para la atención de casos de aborto no punible. Aseguran que los médicos están amparados por la ley.

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Now, women cops to handle rape cases 

NEW DELHI: Rape cases will now be investigated with greater sensitivity as only women officers will be allowed to interact with victims. In a written order, special commissioner (law and order) Dharmendra Kumar has directed all district DCPs to ensure that only women sub-inspectors and inspectors are assigned rape cases. Recently, 11 women officers from the special branch and security units were transferred to police stations for this purpose.

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21st Century Street Harassment: Sneaky Snapshots On Public Transportation

Imagine getting on a local bus or subway car knowing the possibility exists that someone will take your picture and upload it online for viewers to comment on your appearance—all without your permission. Creepy, huh? It’s the new reality for women in Buenos Aires.

By Sharon Haywood, Co-Editor

Last Thursday, May 24th after boarding bus 39 during rush-hour traffic in the Argentine capital, I pushed to the back of the crowded bus where I gratefully claimed a small bubble of personal space all to myself. With one hand on my purse and the other clutching a pole, I scanned the faces of my fellow passengers and stiffened, remembering what my friends at Hollaback! Buenos Aires alerted me to earlier that day: A Facebook page, called Chicas Bondi, roughly translated to “Bus Girls,” pleases its 8000+ fans and counting by posting photos of young Argentine women that are taken surreptitiously on specific bus lines. Bus 39 was one of them. Even though I didn’t fit all the characteristics of a chica bondi (I’m white, but not young and skinny), I still felt uncomfortable; I couldn’t be 100% sure a voyeur wasn’t sneaking a shot of me with his cell phone.

The page owners, who conveniently choose to remain anonymous, defend their actions under the guise of being “art” (giving me serious flashbacks to our Monster campaign, in which violent sexual images of women in a Kanye West video were also justified in the name of “art”). They claim to offer an alternative face of beauty, in contrast to the T&A that is typically shown on some Argentine mainstream television shows. It’s a bit of stretch to believe their argument considering the women who unknowingly become their models all share the same skin color, body type, and age group.

Their tagline, “sin pose y sin permiso/without posing and without permission”, based on fans’ comments, seems to be the biggest pull to the page. The page owners generously stated that if a woman wanted her picture removed, they would graciously do so. What seemed to escape them is that by putting women in the public gaze as objects to be consumed without their knowledge could put some women in danger: when a picture is posted, the bus route is also included, potentially making them targets of harassment. Apart from such risks, this practice is a violation of privacy, plain and simple.

 

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Posted by  ~ The New Yorker

 

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Por Gladis Torres Ruiz * IPS/ Cimac

MÉXICO, may (IPS) - La Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (CIDH) admitió para su análisis el asesinato de otra joven en Ciudad Juárez, mientras el Estado mexicano intenta dar por cumplida la condena por feminicidio por el llamado caso de Campo Algodonero.

La ineficacia del Estado mexicano para detener el feminicidio en el norteño estado de Chihuahua y brindar justicia a las víctimas de nuevo será revisada con lupa por la CIDH. 

El 10 de mayo el mecanismo dependiente de la Organización de Estados Americanos (OEA) notificó que analizará el caso de Lilia Alejandra García Andrade, asesinada cuando tenía 17 años en Ciudad Juárez en 2001. 

Defensoras de Derechos Humanos consideran que la admisión del caso por la CIDH representa un golpe a los intentos de autoridades federales y estatales de dar por cumplida la sentencia emitida en 2009 por la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (CorteIDH) por el caso Campo Algodonero, también en Ciudad Juárez, donde fueron encontrados los restos de ocho mujeres en 2001. 

La abogada Karla Michel Salas, representante legal de Norma Andrade –madre de Lilia Alejandra–, destaca que la decisión de la CIDH pone otra vez sobre la mesa el feminicidio en Juárez y el incumplimiento del Estado mexicano para prevenir y atender las desapariciones de mujeres en esa urbe fronteriza con Estados Unidos. 

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REPORT: The Program on Human Rights and the Global Economy (PHRGE) at Northeastern University School of Law has just released a report on how human rights strategies can be used to address the many challenges facing immigrants to the U.S. and their communities. Convened in October 2010, the “Beyond National Security: Immigrant Communities and Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights” institute (see previous post here) gathered community activists, human rights, immigrants’ rights, and civil rights attorneys, workers’ rights advocates, political scientists, sociologists, journalists, law students, and legal scholars to share concerns, strategies, and potential collaborations.
 

 

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